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Week of June 10, 2013

Regents roundup

The following items were approved the Board of Regents at its May 16 meeting.

Lab renovation planned at G. G. Brown

A renovation of an existing lab space on the second floor of the George Granger Brown Memorial Laboratories building will allow the relocation of a flame spray pyrolysis apparatus used in nanoparticle research into a separate containment room to improve safety. The $1.6 million project will be funded by the College of Engineering and is scheduled to be completed next winter.

Power Center improvements

The Power Center for the Performing Arts will receive finish updates, new lighting, accessibility improvements and life safety improvements. University investment proceeds will fund the $1.5 million project. Work will be scheduled around the performance season and will be completed in the spring of 2015.

Lorch Hall roof to be replaced

The slate and membrane roof at Lorch Hall will be replaced in a $1.15 million project funded from General Fund resources. Work is scheduled to be completed this summer.

Work planned at NCRC powerhouse

Electrical switch gear will be replaced at Building 80, the North Campus Research Complex’s powerhouse that provides electricity, steam, and other utilities to most of the complex. The replacement project, funded by the Medical School, will cost $3.1 million and is scheduled to be completed next summer.

Ann Arbor Campus

Faculty appointments and promotions with tenure.

James L. Hilton, professor of information, School of Information, effective Sept. 1, 2013.

Stefan Nagel, professor of finance, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, and professor of economics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2013.

Named professorships

* James M. Borders, Glenn McGeoch Collegiate Professor of Music, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2018.

* Dr. Valerie P. Castle, Ravitz Foundation Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School, effective July 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

James L. Hilton, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, School of Information, effective Sept. 1, 2013.

Dr. Maha H. A. Hussain, Cis Maisel Professor of Oncology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

* Roderick J. A. Little, Richard D. Remington Collegiate Professor of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2018.

Anna K. Mapp, Edwin Vedejs Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective May 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

Adam J. Matzger, Charles G. Overberger Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective May 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

Jacques Mistral, Helen L. DeRoy Visiting Professor in Honors, LSA, effective Sept. 1-Dec. 31, 2013.

Stefan Nagel, Donald C. Cook Professor of Business Administration, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Sept. 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

John Neville-Andrews, Claribel Baird Halstead Professor, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective Sept. 1, 2013-May 31, 2016.

John Daniel Pasquale, Donald R. Shepherd Chair in Conducting, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2016.

* Kon-Well Wang, Stephen P. Timoshenko Collegiate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

Administrative appointments

Daniel A. Crane, associate dean for academic affairs, Law School, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2016.

* Ruth E. Dunkle, associate dean for faculty and academic affairs, School of Social Work, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2016.

* J. Kevin Graffagnino, director, William L. Clements Library, effective Nov. 17, 2013-Aug. 31, 2016.

Monica Hakimi, associate dean for academic affairs, Law School, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2016.

James L. Hilton, dean of libraries, university librarian, effective Sept. 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

* Nancy K. Janz, associate dean for academic affairs, School of Public Health, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2014.

John D. Meeker, associate dean for research, School of Public Health, effective May 1, 2013-April 30, 2016.

* Elizabeth B. Moje, associate dean for research and community engagement, School of Education, effective Sept. 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2016.

David A. Santacroce, associate dean for clinical affairs, Law School, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2016.

Roopal R. Shah, assistant dean for international affairs, Law School, effective May 6, 2013-Aug. 31, 2015.

* Michael Spencer, associate dean for educational programs, School of Social Work, effective June 1, 2013-May 31, 2015.

Elona D. Van Gent, associate dean for academic programs, Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2016.

Dearborn Campus

Mesut Duran, associate dean for research and administrative affairs, School of Education, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014.

Paul R. Fossum, associate dean of academic affairs, School of Education, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014.

Martin J. Hershock, dean, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, effective July 1, 2013-June 30, 2018.

* Reappointments

Retirements

Richard Abel, Robert Altman Collegiate Professor of Film Studies and professor of international film and media, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 2002. A leading figure of early cinema studies, his critical monographs and two-volume sourcebook of early critical and theoretical writings opened the world of silent French cinema to English speaking scholars. He also focused on the relationship between American film and print culture. He received the prestigious Theatre Library Association Award three times for best book in film, the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for College Teachers twice, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. Abel also served as president of the Society for Cinema Studies.

Peter M. Bauland, associate professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective May 31. Bauland joined the faculty in 1964. His research focused on film studies, modern drama, modern comparative literature and translations, with an emphasis on German and American Theater. He wrote books and translations, and taught popular courses on drama, film study, comedy, Shakespeare, comparative modern literature, screenwriting and playwriting. His professional and community service includes several posts for Fulbright programs, the International Exchange of Scholars, the Midwest Modern Language Association, the Michigan Theater, and numerous appearances as an actor on stage, screen, television and radio. He received distinguished fellowships from the Fulbright-Hays Program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Rackham School of Graduate Studies.

Frederick D. Becchetti Jr., professor of physics, LSA, effective May 31. Becchetti joined the faculty in 1973. His research focused on heavy-ion nuclear physics and the development and use of large superconducting ion-optical magnet systems. Becchetti and G.W. Greenlees developed a widely used optical model parameterization for light ion scattering and transfer reactions. His innovations continued with the use of superconducting solenoids as focusing elements for rare isotopes and his work to improve detectors. These improvements have been used in nuclear physics studies. Becchetti has been developing techniques to provide magnetic confinement of the dose from electron and x-ray beams used in cancer therapy. He has received grants from many sponsoring agencies and has worked closely with the department’s Physics Olympiad, Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, and Saturday Morning Physics.

Richard D. Cureton, associate professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1985. Cureton’s research focused on the temporal and linguistic rhythmic hierarchies of poetry, integrating and systematizing the work of contemporary musicology and linguistics. He explicated his theory of poetics in “Rhythmic Phrasing in English Verse,” and applied, elaborated and expanded this theory in numerous book entries, articles, reviews, responses and conference papers. Cureton taught undergraduate courses in English language, poetics, and poetry, mentored independent study, served on a number of departmental committees, and participated with several national and international associations. He has been a constant advocate for the use of poetic texts in language instruction.

Dee W. Edington, professor of kinesiology in the School of Kinesiology and research scientist in the School of Public Health, effective May 31. Edington joined the faculty in 1976. He distinguished himself by his innovative and pioneering translational research on workplace and occupational health management using cost-effective methods. Edington published findings in a wide array of journals and presented at numerous conferences. Under his leadership the Department of Physical Education began a transformation that culminated in the creation of the School of Kinesiology. Edington is the recipient of several awards and honors including the Vern Seefeldt Lifetime Achievement Award from the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports, and the American College of Preventive Medicine’s Distinguished Katharine Boucot Sturgis Award.

Lincoln B. Faller, professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1968. A specialist in the literatures of 18th-century England, his monographs “Turned to Account: The Forms and Functions of Criminal Biography in Late Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth-Century England,” and “Crime and Defoe: A New Kind of Writing,” focus on the intersection of legal discourse and journalistic reportage in prose fiction. Faller taught, researched and wrote for the past 20 years on Native American studies. To colleagues and students, Faller modeled the ideals of teaching, scholarship and university citizenship. He served as an associate dean, department chair, and was the recipient of a Fulbright award, a National Endowment for the Humanities research fellowship and five Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Education.

Anne C. Herrmann, professor of English language and literature and professor of women’s studies in LSA, effective May 31. She joined the faculty in 1983. Herrmann’s scholarly work lies at the intersection of three fields fundamental to the disciplines of English and women’s studies: modernist literary criticism, feminist theory and queer theory. She authored a groundbreaking study of modernist culture from the perspective of queer theory and a book that pioneered feminist applications of the literary theories of M. M. Bakhtin. She also co-edited a volume of interdisciplinary essays in the field of women’s studies, published a feminist memoir and numerous essays, articles and chapters in books. Herrmann received the John D’Arms Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities.

Magdalene Lampert, George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Education and professor of education in the School of Education, effective May 31. She joined the faculty in 1993. Lampert’s research focused on understanding and portraying the world of classroom practice to the academic community. Her work sought to provide concrete, evidence-based support of mathematics education reforms. Lampert authored several seminal journal articles and the landmark study “Teaching Problems and the Problems of Teaching.” An outstanding teacher and mentor, she taught graduate students in the teaching and teacher education program and the mathematics education program. Lampert was elected to the National Academy of Education in recognition of her broadly influential work.

Zheng-Dong Ma, research scientist in the College of Engineering, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1991. Ma’s research focused on the field of computational mechanics including structural dynamics, multibody system dynamics, coupled structural-acoustic systems, and optimal designs of structural and material systems. His findings are summarized in numerous journal articles, symposium proceedings, and conference abstracts. He has received five best paper awards and has been invited to seminars and lectures outside the university, including at the Beijing Institute of Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology and numerous corporations. Ma was elected a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Technical Committee of Multibody Systems and Nonlinear Dynamics, and received the College of Engineering’s Outstanding Research Scientist Award.

Andrew W. Mead, professor of music in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1983. Mead explored and published numerous writings on the music of Milton Babbitt, Elliott Carter, Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern. He also studied abstract 12-tone theory and rhythmic theory. His work has appeared in many leading journals including The Journal of Music Theory, and Theory and Practice. He has received honors for his achievements including the Goddard Lieberson Fellowship in Composition, the Society for Music Theory Young Scholar’s Publication Award, the Institute for the Humanities’ Michigan Faculty Fellowship, and the John H. D’Arms Faculty Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities.

David J. Tucker, professor of social work in the School of Social Work and adjunct professor of sociology, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1990. Tucker served as director of the Joint Doctoral Program in Social Work and Social Science from 2001-05. His scholarly work focused on the formation, growth and death of organizations; the structural analysis of inter-organizational service delivery systems; and the application of macro organizational theory to the analysis of social policy issues. More recently he studied the production and validation of knowledge. His research found graduates of interdisciplinary programs have a more generalist scholarly orientation and higher levels of scholarly productivity. Tucker served as a dissertation advisor and independent study advisor for a generation of graduate students.

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The Ann Arbor Summer Festival returns with Top of the Park Rackham stage shows and films, beginning at 7 p.m. June 14 at Ingalls Mall.

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